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INSIGHTS

HIMSS 2017 Recap - Value Based Care, Interoperability, API's ....

on 2/27/17 2:34 PM By | Jurek Dzierzanowski | 0 Comments | Healthcare Tech HIMSS
 As HIMSS 2017 winds down, and 45,000 visitors make their way home from Orlando I think back to the 4 days of educational sessions, thousands of steps across the exhibitor floor, countless conversations with colleagues, and am left with several key takeaways …
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NVISIA Discusses MACRA at PCPI 2016 Fall Conference Program

on 10/26/16 3:32 PM By | Mark Panthofer | 0 Comments | News Healthcare Tech
On Thursday October 27, 2016 NVISIA's managing director and healthcare expert, Raymond D’Onofrio, will present at the PCPI 2016 Fall conference at the Chicago Marriott O'Hare. In a session titled, Aligning next-generation data collection with measurement and improvement needs in MACRA, Ray will discuss how advances in data science are transforming how data are collected and analyzed both in healthcare and other industries. The panel addresses the increasingly important question, "who collect, measure, analyze and improve with health data, including health system data warehouse and clinical registry stewards and users, leverage these opportunities?"
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Patient-Centered Research

on 10/14/14 11:06 AM By | Erik Gfesser | 0 Comments | Healthcare Tech Executive Insights
Continuing our review of the recent special report on healthcare and technology in the April 18, 2009 issue of The Economist magazine, the writers further their discussion of patient empowerment and the bottom-up approach to tackling healthcare by looking at patient-centered research, which according to Gregory Simon of Faster Cures, an advocacy group in Washington, is “the key” to bigger things beyond the movement of patients to the center of the medical system, now just in its infancy.
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HIT or Miss

on 10/14/14 11:06 AM By | Erik Gfesser | 0 Comments | Architecture & Design Healthcare Tech Executive Insights
In its recent April 18, 2009 special report on health care and technology, The Economist magazine offers a nice high-level summary of both the progress and struggles that have taken place in this space, and concludes that the digitization of medical records is getting closer through health information technologies (HIT) such as electronic health records (EHRS). While the terminology in this space is still evolving, the article entitled  “Hit or Miss” in this report defines EHRS as “digitized versions of all the bits of paper usually kept in files by all the doctors a patient sees regularly”, and EHRS as “all the hardware, software, and other kit needed to make sense of the data and to give remote access to them”.
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Patient Search Cycle Time

on 10/14/14 11:05 AM By | Erik Gfesser | 0 Comments | Healthcare Tech Executive Insights
During a recent project engagement, my client stressed his observation that physicians often have unique expectations associated with process flow.  Of the examples shared, one worth noting was associated with a frequent physician need to minimize the time needed to search for patient records.  While practitioners of the five steps of the Six Sigma process, DMAIC, might view this as a typical cycle time problem, the situation here has a bit of a twist in the sense that total cycle time of the process flow for patient record search was not the concern.  The concern that my client communicated was solely focused on the time needed by the physician themselves to perform this particular process activity.
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Examinations and Usability

on 10/14/14 11:05 AM By | Erik Gfesser | 0 Comments | Healthcare Tech Executive Insights
A study not yet submitted for publication that was conducted by resident physician Yehonatan N. Turner, concluded that the inclusion of patient photographs alongside digital radiographic examinations should be routine due to the apparent positive effect this practice had on the performance of radiologists.  This study was presented earlier this week at the Radiological Society of North America conference along with 4,000 other studies.  Much attention is being given to this particular study, however, because it focuses on the radiologist-patient relationship rather than traditional radiology training.
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ICD-10 - The future of the Medical Coding System

on 10/14/14 10:49 AM By | Erik Gfesser | 0 Comments | Healthcare Tech Executive Insights
This past week, The Wall Street Journal reported on the plan of U.S. government regulators to overhaul the aging coding system, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), that physicians and hospitals currently use to bill insurers. The new system, called ICD-10, to which most of the world’s developed countries have already adopted, is expected to result in a 10-fold increase in the number of codes for ailments and procedures. One extreme example from the current system is the single billing code for angioplasty, which will grow to 1,170 billing codes to provide more detailed descriptions as to the locations and devices involved. The new system of 155,000 codes consists of both diagnosis and medical procedures codes, and while hospitals use both types of codes, physicians use only diagnostic codes from the current system. Use of 9,200 codes from the American Medical Association (AMA) that were created in the 1960s are still being relied upon for procedure codes. The current coding system is simply no longer expandable. From a business perspective, several potential pros and cons are associated with a move to the new ICD-10 medical-coding system: Pro: Increase in patient detail. Pro: Increase in payments. Con: Increase in cost. Con: Increase in errors. Con: Existing hospital systems must be upgraded to to handle ICD-10
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Supporting Downtime in a Clinical Setting

For the average application, IT professionals strive to minimize downtime. But when it happens – as it inevitably will – the users are simply forced to wait until the system is once again available. In a clinical setting, this strategy is not acceptable. Regardless of whether the system unavailability is caused by an outage in your server or the hospital’s connectivity to it, the hospital must address the question: How will we continue to care for patients until the system comes back up?
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MU Reporter Receives ONC-ATCB 2011/2012 Certification

on 10/13/14 11:27 AM By | Mark Panthofer | 0 Comments | Healthcare Tech News
NVISIA announced today that MU Reporter 1.0 is 2011/2012 compliant and was certified as an EHR Module on June 22, 2012 by the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT®), an ONC-ATCB, in accordance with the applicable hospital certification criteria adopted by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. The 2011/2012 criteria support the Stage 1 meaningful use measures required to qualify eligible providers and hospitals for funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). “MU Reporter is a powerful, highly flexible meaningful use and business intelligence tool that excels in helping meet client needs for accessing metrics and storing and sharing supporting documentation,” commented NVISIA President Shaun Lovick. “We feel CCHIT® certification validates that we have developed unique features and functionality that will serve clients well long into the future.” The ONC-ATCB 2011/2012 certification program tests and certifies that Complete EHRs meet all of the 2011/2012 criteria and EHR Modules meet one or more – but not all – of the criteria approved by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) for either eligible provider or hospital technology. “CCHIT is pleased to be testing and certifying products so that companies are now able to offer these products to providers who wish to purchase and implement certified EHR technology and achieve meaningful use in time for the 2011-2012 incentives,” said Karen M. Bell, M.D., M.S.S., Chair, CCHIT. MU Reporter 1.0’s certification number is CC-1112-100043-1. ONC-ATCB 2011/2012 certification conferred by CCHIT does not represent an endorsement of the certified EHR technology by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services nor does it guarantee the receipt of incentive payments. MU Reporter 1.0 meets the following certification criteria: 170.302 automated measure calculation, 170.302 access control, 170.302 automatic log-off, 170.302 audit log, 170.302 integrity, 170.302 authentication, 170.302 general encryption, 170.302 encryption when exchanging electronic health information and 170.306 calculate and submit clinical quality measures. The clinical quality measures to which MU Reporter has been certified include: NQF 0371, NQF 0372, NQF 0373, NQF 0374, NQF 0375, NQF 0376, NQF 0435, NQF 0436, NQF 0437, NQF 0438, NQF 0439, NQF 0440, NQF 0441, NQF 0495 and NQF 0497. About NVISIA NVISIA is an IT consulting firm that designs and delivers custom applications in the growing fields of healthcare, financial services and insurance. They specialize in developing IT solutions that enable clients to lead their industry or respond to competitive threats by offering new products and services to their customers and partners. Since 1991 NVISIA has been focused on object-oriented technology and building distributed systems, relying on NVISIA developers, architects and analysts who are the best in the business. About CCHIT The Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT®) is an independent, 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with the public mission of accelerating the adoption of robust, interoperable health information technology. The Commission has been certifying electronic health record technology since 2006 and is approved by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as an Authorized Testing and Certification Body (ONC-ATCB). More information on CCHIT, CCHIT Certified® products and ONC-ATCB certified electronic health record technology is available athttp://cchit.org. About ONC-ATCB 2011/2012 certification The ONC-ATCB 2011/2012 certification program tests and certifies that EHR technology is capable of meeting the 2011/2012 criteria approved by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS). The certifications include Complete EHRs, which meet all of the 2011/2012 criteria for either eligible provider or hospital technology and EHR Modules, which meet one or more – but not all – of the criteria. ONC-ATCB certification aligns with Health Information Technology: Initial Set of Standards, Implementation Specifications, and Certification Criteria for Electronic Health Record Technologypublished in the Federal Register in July 2010 and strictly adheres to the test procedures published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at the time of testing. ONC-ATCB 2011/2012 certification conferred by the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT®) does not represent an endorsement of the certified EHR technology by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services nor does it guarantee the receipt of incentive payments. “CCHIT®” and “CCHIT Certified®” are registered trademarks of the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology.
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